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. >> the policies that the republicans have offer -- are offering right now are the exact policies that got us into this mess. >> i think it just shows how out of touch the white house is. the american people are asking the question, where are the jobs? >> over the coming midterm election. >> what i'm going to remind the american people of is the policies that we have put in place have moved us in the right direction. >> no apologies for opposing the stimulus, no apologies for opposing the health care. no apologies for opposing what they call the wall street bill. gwen: and a sensational and distracting threat from an obscure florida pastor. >> we are simply burning a book. >> it doesn't in any way represent america or americans or american government or american religious or political leadership. >> we have to make sure that we don't start turning on each other. gwen: we'll put the roller coaster week in context with jackie calmes of "the new york times," david wessel of "the wall street journal" and michael duffy of "time" magazine. >> award-winning reporting and analysis. covering history a
, the engine that connects us. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the president accused the republicans of being fiscally irresponsible, but admitted that his own policies have not worked as quickly as hoped. congressional correspondent kwame holman reports. >> we got some business to do today. >> reporter: just eight weeks from election day, the president made his pitch in cleveland today to help the sputtering u.s. economy >> that means making long-term investments in education and clean energy; in basic research, technology, and infrastructure. >> reporter: and he also took a stand against extending the bush era tax cuts for the top 2% of earners, setting up a pre- election fight with republicans in congress. he accused the g.o.p. of being mr. obama repeatedl
our economy into a ditch, or do we keep moving forward with policies that are slowly pulling us out? >> reporter: too slowly, republicans fired back. on jobs, republican leader john boehner argued the president's policies are the problem, and a few new ideas won't change that. >> until this uncertainty and spending is under control... i don't think these are going to have much impact. >> reporter: what does all this politicking mean for your bottom line? first, on those new proposals from the president: $50 billion in infrastructure spending, an expansion and extension of the research and development tax credits, and 100% expensing of new equipment. the last is most likely to become law, and even that analysts consider a long shot. second, whatever the election outcome, there will be less help coming for the economy. goldman sachs washington analyst alec philips says that's one reason his firm is downgrading their economic forecast for 2011. >> there's really three things happening there. one is the fading effect of the 2009 fiscal stimulus bill. number two is our concern that congr
family housing as an investment. if the three of us decided to go in together on a real estate investment and i said i have a plan. we'll build a 3,000 square foot house that will fit only one family you would say to me that's not a very good plan. we should bill a building where we can maximize the amount of rent that flows through it and have people with just as much living space as they need. the single family house in america is a poor investment by design. go back 30 years and you had houses that were 1700 square feet. today they've come down over the past year a little bit but they're still 2400 square feet own though the size of the average american family has gotten smaller over that time. clearly houses today are mostly consumption. they're not designed for investment. there's nothing wrong with home ownership. just don't go into it thinking you're going to get rich. go into it because you have a lot of money and you want something nice. >> brown: carl case, what do you think about that? >> i agree with that. there are negative surprises that happen when you buy a home too. i mea
or not confident that life for our children's generation will be better than it has been for us? 66% do not kill confidence. is america in a state of decline? 65% believe the country is in a state of decline. how do you come back from that? >> it is tough to do. historically, internationally, the u.s. has been the home office of national optimism. optimism breed confidence. if you are optimistic about the future, you can take a chance, whether it is the gi bill, air, water, pollution act's that made a difference. when people lack confidence, there is a sense of hunkering down, i cannot be concerned about other people. it makes me a lot more self concerned. it has a political ripple effect that is enormous. i do not think it has been totally calculated. >> the president says we will put money into infrastructure. john boehner wants to cut spending. how does that instill confidence in the american people? >> it does not compute to the average person. it is said that macroeconomics will benefit the system, but why do people not feel that? politicians in both parties have sort of lost credibility. i
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)